Free access
Issue
Vet. Res.
Volume 31, Number 6, November-December 2000
Page(s) 541 - 551
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/vetres:2000138
How to cite this article Vet. Res. (2000) 541-551
DOI: 10.1051/vetres:2000138

Vet. Res. 31 (2000) 541-551

The distribution of vitamin A and retinol-binding protein in the blood plasma, urine, liver and kidneys of carnivores

Jens Railaa - Ingeborg Buchholzb - Heike Aupperlec - Gerit Railac - Heinz-Adolf Schoonc - Florian J. Schweigerta

aInstitute of Nutritional Science, University Potsdam, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany
bDepartment of Physiology, University Leipzig, Veterinary Faculty, An den Tierkliniken 7, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
cInstitute of Veterinary-Pathology, University Leipzig, Veterinary Faculty, An den Tierkliniken 33, 04103 Leipzig, Germany

(Received 10 January 2000; accepted 27 June 2000)

Abstract:

The contents of retinol and retinyl esters as well as retinol-binding protein (RBP) in the plasma, urine, liver and kidneys of dogs, raccoon dogs and silver foxes were investigated. In the plasma and urine of all three species, vitamin A was present as retinol and retinyl esters. Vitamin A levels ( $1 376 \pm 669$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1) were significantly higher in the livers of dogs than in the kidneys ( $200 \pm 217$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1, P < 0.001). However, vitamin A levels in the kidneys of raccoon dogs ( $291 \pm 146$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1) and silver foxes ( $474 \pm 200$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1) were significantly higher than in the liver ($67 \pm 58$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1 and $4.3 \pm 2.4$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1, respectively, both P < 0.001). RBP was immunologically detected in the blood plasma of all species, but never in the urine. In the liver, immunoreactive RBP was found in hepatocytes. In the kidneys of all species, RBP was observed in the cells of the proximal convoluted tubules. The levels of vitamin A in the livers of raccoon dogs and silver foxes were extremely low, which would be interpreted as a sign of great deficiency in humans. This observation might indicate that the liver status cannot be used as an indicator of vitamin A deficiency in canines. The high levels of vitamin A in the kidneys in all three species may indicate a specific function of the kidney in the vitamin A metabolism of canines.


Keywords: vitamin A / carnivore / liver / kidney / urine

Résumé:

Distribution de la vitamine A et de la protéine liant le rétinol dans le plasma sanguin, l'urine, le foie et le rein de carnivores. Les concentrations en rétinol et rétinyl esters et en protéine liant le rétinol (PLR) dans le plasma, l'urine, le foie et le rein de chiens, de ratons laveurs et de renards argentés ont été mesurées. Dans le plasma et l'urine des trois espèces, la vitamine A était présente sous forme de rétinol et de rétinyl esters. Dans le foie des chiens, les teneurs en vitamine A ( $1 376 ~\pm~ 669$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1) étaient significativement supérieures à celles du rein ( $200 ~\pm~ 217$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1, P < 0,001). Cependant, les teneurs en vitamine A dans le rein de raton laveur ( $291 \pm 146$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1) et de renard ( $474 ~\pm~ 200$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1) étaient significativement supérieures à celles du foie ( $67 ~\pm~ 58$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1 et $4,3 ~\pm~ 2,4$ $\mu$g$\cdot$g-1, respectivement, P < 0,001 pour chacune). PLR a été immunologiquement détectée dans le plasma sanguin de toutes les espèces, mais jamais dans l'urine. Dans le foie, de la PLR immunoréactive a été détectée dans les hépatocytes. Dans le rein, la PLR a été observée dans les cellules du tube contourné proximal dans toutes les espèces. Les taux de vitamine A dans le foie de ratons laveurs et de renards étaient extrêmement bas (qui pourraient être considérés comme le signe d'une déficience sévère chez l'humain), malgré la présence de rétinyl esters dans le plasma. Cette observation pourrait indiquer que le statut du foie ne peut être utilisé comme indicateur de la déficience en vitamine A chez les canidés. Les taux élevés de vitamine A dans le rein des trois espèces pourraient indiquer une fonction spécifique du rein pour le métabolisme de la vitamine A chez les canidés.


Mots clé : vitamine A / carnivore / foie / rein / urine

Correspondence and reprints: Jens Raila
Tel.: (49) 33 20 08 85 32; fax: (49) 33 20 08 85 73; e-mail: jraila@rz.uni-potsdam.de

Copyright INRA, EDP Sciences

What is OpenURL?

The OpenURL standard is a protocol for transmission of metadata describing the resource that you wish to access.

An OpenURL link contains article metadata and directs it to the OpenURL server of your choice. The OpenURL server can provide access to the resource and also offer complementary services (specific search engine, export of references...). The OpenURL link can be generated by different means.

  • If your librarian has set up your subscription with an OpenURL resolver, OpenURL links appear automatically on the abstract pages.
  • You can define your own OpenURL resolver with your EDPS Account.
    In this case your choice will be given priority over that of your library.
  • You can use an add-on for your browser (Firefox or I.E.) to display OpenURL links on a page (see http://www.openly.com/openurlref/). You should disable this module if you wish to use the OpenURL server that you or your library have defined.